Boeing YAL-1

ICAO aircraft code YAL1
Manufacturer Boeing
Country United States
New price USD 700 million

The Boeing YAL-1 Airborne Laser Testbed (formerly Airborne Laser) weapons system was a megawatt-class chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) mounted inside a modified military Boeing 747-400F.

Specifications

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Boeing YAL-1 Specifications

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General

ICAO aircraft code
YAL1
Manufacturer
Boeing
Manufactured
2002 - 2002
Country
United States
New purchase price
USD 700 million

Aircraft performance

Engine:
4x 4 X Pratt And Whitney PW 4062
Turbofan
Power:
63,300 pound-force
Max Cruise Speed:
486 Kts
900 Km/h
Travel range:
4,445 Nm
8,232 Kilometers
Fuel Economy:
0.08 Nm / gallon
0.039 Km / liter
Service Ceiling:
45,100 feet
Rate of Climb:

Take Off Distance:
3018 meter - 9,901.45 feet
Landing Distance:
2300 meter - 7,545.84 feet

Weight & dimensions

Max Take Off Weight:
396,893 Kg
874,990 lbs
Max Payload:
112,629 Kg
248,302 lbs
Fuel Tank Capacity:
57,285 gallon
216,847 liter

Disclaimer: The information on this page may not be accurate or current. Never use it for flight planning or any other aircraft operation purposes. No warranty of fitness for any purpose is made or implied. Flight planning or any other aircraft operations should only be done using official technical information provided by the manufacture or official aviation authorities.

About the Boeing YAL-1

The Boeing YAL-1 Airborne Laser Testbed (formerly Airborne Laser) weapons system was a megawatt-class chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) mounted inside a modified military Boeing 747-400F. It was primarily designed as a missile defense system to destroy tactical ballistic missiles (TBMs) while in boost phase. The aircraft was designated YAL-1A in 2004 by the U.S. Department of Defense.

The YAL-1 with a low-power laser was test-fired in flight at an airborne target in 2007. A high-energy laser was used to intercept a test target in January 2010, and the following month, successfully destroyed two test missiles. Funding for the program was cut in 2010 and the program was canceled in December 2011. It made its final flight on February 14, 2012, to Davis–Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona, to be kept in storage at the “Boneyard” by the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group. It was ultimately scrapped in September 2014 after all usable parts were removed.

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