Douglas DC-3

ICAO aircraft code DC3
Manufacturer Douglas Aircraft Co.
Country United States
New price USD .079 million (1936)

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven airliner, which had a lasting effect on the airline industry in the 1930s to 1940s and World War II.
It was developed as a larger, improved 14-bed sleeper version of the Douglas DC-2.
It is a low-wing metal monoplane with conventional landing gear, powered by two radial piston engines of 1,000–1,200hp (750–890kW).

Specifications

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Douglas DC-3 Specifications

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General

ICAO aircraft code
DC3
Manufacturer
Douglas Aircraft Co.
Manufactured
1935 - 1942
Country
United States
New purchase price
USD .079 million (1936)

Aircraft performance

Engine:
2x Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S1C3G Twin Wasp
Piston
Power:
1,200 HP
Max Cruise Speed:
200 Kts
370 Km/h
Travel range:
1,890 Nm
3,500 Kilometers
Service Ceiling:
24,000 feet
Rate of Climb:
1130 feet / minute
5.74meter / second

Weight & dimensions

Max Take Off Weight:
13,605 Kg
29,994 lbs
Max Payload:
2,725 Kg
6,008 lbs
Fuel Tank Capacity:
822 gallon
3,112 liter

Disclaimer: The information on this page may not be accurate or current. Never use it for flight planning or any other aircraft operation purposes. No warranty of fitness for any purpose is made or implied. Flight planning or any other aircraft operations should only be done using official technical information provided by the manufacture or official aviation authorities.

About the Douglas DC-3

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven airliner, which had a lasting effect on the airline industry in the 1930s to 1940s and World War II.
It was developed as a larger, improved 14-bed sleeper version of the Douglas DC-2.
It is a low-wing metal monoplane with conventional landing gear, powered by two radial piston engines of 1,000–1,200hp (750–890kW). (Although most DC-3s flying today use Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp engines, many DC-3s built for civil service originally had the Wright R-1820 Cyclone.)
The DC-3 has a cruising speed of 207mph (333km/h), a capacity of 21 to 32 passengers or 6,000lbs (2,700kg) of cargo, and a range of 1,500mi (2,400km), and can operate from short runways.

The DC-3 had many exceptional qualities compared to previous aircraft. It was fast, had a good range, was more reliable, and carried passengers in greater comfort. Before the war, it pioneered many air travel routes. It was able to cross the continental US from New York to Los Angeles in 18 hours, with only three stops.
It is one of the first airliners that could profitably carry only passengers without relying on mail subsidies.

Following the war, the airliner market was flooded with surplus transport aircraft, and the DC-3 was no longer competitive due to its size and speed.
It was made obsolete on main routes by more advanced types such as the Douglas DC-4 and Lockheed Constellation, but the design proved adaptable and useful on less glamorous routes.

Civilian DC-3 production ended in 1942 at 607 aircraft. Military versions, including the C-47 Skytrain (the Dakota in British RAF service), and Soviet- and Japanese-built versions, brought total production to over 16,000.
Many continued to be used in a variety of niche roles; 2,000 DC-3s and military derivatives were estimated to be still flying in 2013; a 2017 article put the number at that time at more than 300.

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