Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star

ICAO aircraft code P80
Country United States
New price USD 0.11 million (1945)

The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first jet fighter used operationally by the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF).

Specifications

Full description

Similar aircraft

Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star specifications

General

ICAO aircraft code
P80
Manufacturer
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
Manufactured
1945 - 1950
Country
United States
New purchase price
USD 0.11 million (1945)

Aircraft performance

Engine:
1x Allison J33-A-35
Jet
Power:
4,600 pound-force
Max Cruise Speed:
516 Kts
956 Km/h
Travel range:
1,200 Nm
2,222 Kilometers
Service Ceiling:
46,800 feet
Rate of Climb:
6870 feet / minute
34.90meter / second

Weight & dimensions

Max Take Off Weight:
7,257 Kg
15,999 lbs
Max Landing Weight:
6,350 Kg
13,999 lbs
Max Payload:
1,000 Kg
2,205 lbs
Fuel Tank Capacity:
885 gallon
3,350 liter

Disclaimer: The information on this page may not be accurate or current. Never use it for flight planning or any other aircraft operation purposes. No warranty of fitness for any purpose is made or implied. Flight planning or any other aircraft operations should only be done using official technical information provided by the manufacture or official aviation authorities.

About the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star

The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first jet fighter used operationally by the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF). Designed and built by Lockheed in 1943 and delivered just 143 days from the start of the design process, production models were flying, and two pre-production models did see very limited service in Italy just before the end of World War II. Designed with straight wings, the type saw extensive combat in Korea with the United States Air Force (USAF) as the F-80.

America’s first successful turbojet-powered combat aircraft, it helped usher in the “jet age” in the USAF, but was outclassed with the appearance of the swept-wing transonic MiG-15 and was quickly replaced in the air superiority role by the transonic F-86 Sabre. The F-94 Starfire, an all-weather interceptor on the same airframe, also saw Korean War service. The closely related T-33 Shooting Star trainer remained in service with the U.S. Air Force and Navy well into the 1980s, with the last NT-33 variant not retired until April 1997.

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