LTV A-7 Corsair II

ICAO aircraft code A7
Manufacturer Vought
Country United States
New price USD 2.86 million (1967)

The LTV A-7 Corsair II is an American carrier-capable subsonic light attack aircraft designed and manufactured by Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV).
The A-7 was developed during the early 1960s as replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk.

Specifications

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LTV A-7 Corsair II Specifications

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General

ICAO aircraft code
A7
Manufacturer
Vought
Manufactured
1965 - 1984
Country
United States
New purchase price
USD 2.86 million (1967)

Aircraft performance

Avionics:
AN/ASN-90(V), AN/ASN-91(V), AN/APN-190(V), Texas Instruments AN/APQ-126(V) , AN/AVQ-7(V) HUD etc.
Engine:
1x Allison TF41-A-2
Turbofan
Power:
15,000 pound-force
Max Cruise Speed:
600 Kts
1,111 Km/h
Travel range:
2,280 Nm
4,223 Kilometers
Service Ceiling:
42,000 feet
Rate of Climb:
15000 feet / minute
76.20meter / second
Take Off Distance:
1705 meter - 5,593.76 feet

Weight & dimensions

Max Take Off Weight:
19,050 Kg
41,998 lbs
Max Payload:
7,000 Kg
15,432 lbs
Fuel Tank Capacity:
1,338 gallon
5,065 liter

Disclaimer: The information on this page may not be accurate or current. Never use it for flight planning or any other aircraft operation purposes. No warranty of fitness for any purpose is made or implied. Flight planning or any other aircraft operations should only be done using official technical information provided by the manufacture or official aviation authorities.

About the LTV A-7 Corsair II

The LTV A-7 Corsair II is an American carrier-capable subsonic light attack aircraft designed and manufactured by Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV).

The A-7 was developed during the early 1960s as replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. Its design was derived from the Vought F-8 Crusader; in comparison with the F-8, the A-7 is both smaller and restricted to subsonic speeds, its airframe being simpler and cheaper to produce. Following a competitive bid by Vought in response to the United States Navy’s (USN) VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) requirement, an initial contract for the type was issued on 8 February 1964. Development was rapid, first flying on 26 September 1965 and entering squadron service with the USN on 1 February 1967; by the end of that year, A-7s were being deployed overseas for the Vietnam War.

Initially adopted by USN, the A-7 proved attractive to other services, soon being adopted by the United States Air Force (USAF) and the Air National Guard (ANG) to replace their aging Douglas A-1 Skyraider and North American F-100 Super Sabre fleets. Improved models of the A-7 would be developed, typically adopting more powerful engines and increasingly capable avionics. American A-7s would be used in various major conflicts, including the Invasion of Grenada, Operation El Dorado Canyon, and the Gulf War. The type was also used to support the development of the Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk.

The A-7 was also exported to Greece in the 1970s and to Portugal in the late 1980s. The USAF and USN opted to retire their remaining examples of the type in 1991, followed by the ANG in 1993 and the Portuguese Air Force in 1999. The A-7 was largely replaced by newer generation fighters such as the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon and the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. The final operator, the Hellenic Air Force, withdrew the last A-7s during 2014.

Other Vought aircraft

Military War Fighter PlanesOther Military Airplanes Vought

Vought SBU Corsair

Fighter Jets Vought

Vought F8U Crusader

Other Military Airplanes Vought

Vought SB2U Vindicator

Similar aircraft to the LTV A-7 Corsair II

Fighter Jets McDonnell Douglas

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II

Fighter Jets Douglas Aircraft Co.

Douglas A-4 Skyhawk

Fighter Jets Yakovlev

Yakovlev Yak-38

Fighter Jets Xian

Xian JH-7

Fighter Jets de Havilland

de Havilland DH.110 Sea Vixen

Fighter Jets North American Aviation NAA

North American F-100 Super Sabre


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